thou cyber sand (Twitter Poem #4)

The Funny Thing about Twitter:

 

the other day  “roman sandals” appeared

twice on my twitter

profile page

Some time later, romansandals starts following me

 

Romans:  stealer of gods but not the  shoe soles of whores

I am wary-

in bare cyber space, more than one user

leads to no safe place

so I leave no indent in the dirt, no greek tweet

and romansandals offers no akolouthi,

no use of language, or other “come follow me”

 

a user with more than

a thousand to read

a thousand to mark

a thousand for triumph, esteem

a thousand for fanning the line

 

romansandals leads me to a blog that exists

and no viral ambush awaits

in the given net space, but

another affront:

shoes and paparazzi, the Furies of celebrity

and the cheapness of the page, the turning

of the same old tricks

slur the said citizen in me

 

what roman sandals are these?

no Romans walked in sandals like these!

where is the sure-footed confidence?  the feeling of weight placed,

equal on each side

the sense of purpose and physical pride-

give and take, to communicate?

 

Instead, I am offered the burden of never-ending youth

and the pain of a crooked spine

I shunned the offer,

and as the oracles in the ether  said,

it came to pass

 

romansandals no longer acknowledges me

#FF #FTW


How to talk to your video gaming significant other

Live In- Nerd Rage

I typed in "nerd rage" and this is what Zemanta found.... Image via Wikipedia

It is 2010, and techno-phobes are crying over our youth’s inability to communicate without a machine and somehow we’ve lost the subtle art of conversation.  Social media is more popular than ever, and even the video game industry (from Xbox Live to Steam) has gotten into the online community-building business.

The exact percentage of the US population that plays video games is unclear, but lies between 68%  (the Critical Gaming Project), and 87%  males/ 80%  females (2009 chart from gameindustry.com). The percentage of the population that plays video games online ( chance for addiction increases) hovers around 58% for males, and 42% for females.

According to some Australian researchers, 1 out of 10 gamers is addicted, but I have a hunch that percentage might be higher. My hunch is based off of Cracked.com’s most excellent piece “5 creepy Ways Video Games Are Trying to Get you Addicted“. For those about to scoff at the idea of being addicted to something that “isn’t even real”, David Wong counters with:

Your brain treats items and goods in the video game world as if they are real. Because they are.

If it takes time, effort and skill to obtain an item, that item has value, whether it’s made of diamonds, binary code or beef jerky.

After all, people pay thousands of dollars for diamonds, even though diamonds do nothing but look pretty. A video game suit of armor looks pretty and protects you from video game orcs. In both cases you’re paying for an idea.

If you or your significant other is a gamer, chances are, there is some form of neglect going on in your relationship.

Before I address the right ways to go about approaching  your significant other when you feel they’ve been playing video games for too long, I would first like to address the wrong ways. And while this “How-To” might seem obvious to some, it apparently isn’t when you consider  the magnitude of people using the wrong methods to deal with their video gaming significant others.

THE WRONG WAY TO GET YOUR GAMER’S ATTENTION

1) Destroying your significant others gaming property, from deleting characters to destroying consoles

The internet is littered with  videos of gaming equipment being destroyed by significant others. Despite many internet users proclaiming these videos as fake, the destruction of property in each video is too real (and also could be deemed illegal in some cases). There is a reason these videos are popular – these videos appeal to both the gamer who fears their significant other will do this to their machines, and to the significant other who sympathizes with the person doing the smashing.

Deleting Characters

The most recent video to make the rounds of the internet is “Girl deletes WoW Characters, Dude destroys Computer

[youtubevid id=”dGBOGamm1x4″]

Read the rest of this entry »


Lady Gaga is a nerd?

I know, I shouldn’t be jumping on the Gaga-“Telephone” video-page view-bandwagon, but I promise to stick to my focus: the poison diner scene, because it references geek culture and video games.

The most obvious thing to note would be that Lady Gaga is a nerd, or attempting to be one…. or her creative director is …. or Lady Gaga herself feels that it is important for the nerds to love her too by throwing in obscure references only they would get. The poison that Lady Gaga super-popstar-feminist concocts in the kitchen includes the following ingredients: Fex-M3 from Star Wars, Meta-Cyanide from Dune and Tiberium from Command and Conquer.

poison picture

Can I imagine Lady Gaga reading science fiction and playing Command and Conquer late at night? Maybe. I mean, she was pretty wacky when she was a brunette so I can’t come out and call her a “poser nerd”. Most likely though, her creative director googled “List of fictional toxins”, since they cannot use real toxins  for fear people would actually poison others, and this is the list that showed up.  All of those toxins mentioned in Gaga’s video are on that list….

Moving into “feminist” territory:

By Lady Gaga using poison to commit mass murder, she is engaging in a stereotypical feminine form of murder. Women traditionally controlled the food, and you’d be surprised how many men have died throughout history by the hands of women using poison, and it was never noted or observed because men felt it was beneath them to go into the kitchen?  There is a saying among the Hungarians that the bride Ildiko killed Attila the Hun on their wedding night by poisoning him.  A nosebleed? Come on…. but it’s cute how the men back then thought the women were content enough and incapable of committing such nefarious acts.

So it makes sense in Lady Gaga’s music video homage to Quintin Tarantino that she uses poison instead of blood shedding phallic weapons (NSFW link).  Why would Gaga, with her creative director, decide to use fictional poisons from science fiction and games popular with the males? The use of poison in a setting that asks for guns is too symbolic to ignore. But Commander and Conquer, Star Wars, and Dune don’t seem to be poisoning society like the bad man-made porn, hyper-sexualized advertising, and reality TV shows are… so why were these poisons used, instead of others on that list?   Or maybe I am reading too far into this, and these toxic references are all just for some male geek love.